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Archive for the ‘Nasa Stuff’ Category

Shuttle Discovery Delivered to Smithsonian


Earlier today, you may have seen the news coverage of the transfer of Space Shuttle Discovery to Washington DC on the back of a 747 jetliner. The event of the delivery of a Space Shuttle to the Smithsonian Institution brought thousands of onlookers out to the National Mall to witness Shuttle Discovery at it was flown over our nation’s capitol, and snarled traffic around Dulles International Airport as the jet was making its final approach. Additionally #Discovery was a top trending topic on Twitter throughout the morning. The public reaction to this event leaves no doubt that there is still a high degree of interest in our country’s being a world space and technology leader.

We agree that it is important to preserve America’s history and future as a space faring nation and as a developer of advanced aviation technology. We see our mission to inspire future generations as an important one, and we invite you to join us in creating that future. The youth of today are the scientists, engineers and doctors of tomorrow. We need your help to inspire them to explore new frontiers and find solutions to the problems facing society. Although our efforts are over four years old, we are just getting off the launch pad.

Much has already been accomplished. In the past twelve months we not only brought back the original training gondola (the Mercury 7 Gondola) used by many notable astronauts, but we also obtained, literally, truckloads of other artifacts important to local history; not the least of which is Flanagan Grey’s Iron Maiden.

In addition to building our collection of artifacts and exhibits, we have also begun to develop the most important aspect of our mission; reaching out to schools and other organization to lay the groundwork for our educational outreach and learning programs. In just the past few months we attended our first science fair, hosted the Commonwealth Connections Academy, and presented at the Franklin Institute. We will also be featured at the NJ State Museum in Trenton this month. We have also made presentations to numerous local senior centers, rotary clubs, scout groups and community centers.

The next twelve months will be very important as for us as we search for a full time home to display our collection and as a place to continue to educate and inform the public. We look forward to cleaning and preserving the Mercury 7 Gondola. Plans for a pavilion to house it are also in the works. These efforts will require resources which are not currently in our possession. We ask for your continued support by attending our Third Annual Gala to be held at the VE Club at 130 Davisville Road in Warminster on April 28th at 5:00 PM; by doing so you will help us to continue our journey and fulfill our mission.

Information about the Gala is available at our website at www.nadcmuseum.org. Tickets are available by contacting nadcmuseum@comcast.net or 267-250-8841. Without people like you who care and support us, we would have never accomplished as much as we have and we would not be able to continue into the future.

I personally thank you for your continued support.

Michael Maguire
President, Johnsville Centrifuge & Science Museum

 

Godspeed, John Glenn

50th Anniversary of NASA Milestone
Recalls Local Involvement in the Space Program and
Provides an Opportunity to Inspire Future Leaders
 

“Zero Gs and feeling fine!”  With those five words Mercury astronaut John Herschel Glenn, Jr. signaled that his spacecraft, Friendship 7, had entered its first of three orbits at approximately 2:52 p.m. on February 20, 1962. Four hours and fifty-five minutes later, his capsule would splash down and Glenn would become an iconic national hero – the first American to obit the earth. He would go on to serve 25 years in the U.S. Senate, and enter space history again in 1998 when, at the age of 77, he became the oldest person to fly in space on Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95). Along with Scott Carpenter, John Glenn is the last surviving Project Mercury astronaut. He continues to be an outspoken advocate of America’s continued exploration of space. There is no doubt that Glenn’s flight fifty years ago paved the way for the moonwalk that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin would make almost seven and a half years later.

Those who lived through those days remember that the astronauts were, to put it in today’s parlance, “A-list” celebrities. They received extensive media coverage and often were honored with tickertape parades on Broadway upon their return from space. While there were many spin-offs from the space program that have made modern life better, perhaps the most important is that the feats of the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts inspired a generation of children to pursue technology-based careers in science and engineering. After the Apollo moonwalks and with the advent of the shuttle program in the 1980’s spaceflight became “routine” and public interest in the space program generally waned.

While Bucks County is rich in early American history, local citizens are just starting to learn that before taking to the heavens Glenn and the rest of the NASA astronauts from those early programs came to Bucks County to prepare for the rigors of space flight on the Johnsville Centrifuge, the largest and most powerful human centrifuge ever built. As a matter of fact, the centrifuge gondola (capsule) used to train Glenn and other early astronauts is on public display at the Penn State Anechoic Chamber at 300 W. Bristol Road in Warminster, having returned from a Smithsonian storage facility where it was hidden from public view for over 45 years.  Plans are in the works to begin preservation work on this important artifact.

The Johnsville Centrifuge was just one of dozens of labs at the former Naval Air Development Center (NADC) in Warminster, PA where much of the technology we enjoy today was developed and tested. The Johnsville Centrifuge and Science Museum is a small group of dedicated volunteers working to preserve the legacy of Bucks County’s connection to the space program and to tell the story of the high tech work done at NADC, including refinements to GPS and the development of light sensitive lenses that are part of our everyday life. We believe that our area’s involvement in the space program can serve as an inspirational springboard to encourage our youth to explore the careers in technology that are so vital to our country’s future.

We encourage readers of this to use the 50th anniversary of the Friendship 7 mission as a conversation starter with their children or grandchildren. Ask them if they know who John Glenn is and what they know about the space program. Share with them what you remember about growing up in the space age. If you are old enough, tell them where you where when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. You might be surprised; you may find out they have an interest in space and might even want to become an astronaut.

With today’s “heroes” often coming from the fields of sports and entertainment, there are very few, if any, high profile role models in today’s culture to encourage children to explore science and technology careers. Additionally, local, state and federal education budgets continue to be cut in the face of mounting deficits. The museum, along with its sponsors and partners, sees it as their mission to inspire the youth of today. This past month the museum hosted the students of the Commonwealth Connections Academy and their mobile classroom and participated in the Quarry Hill Elementary School Science Fair. It continues to develop its educational outreach programs. 

We salute Col. Glenn on the 50th Anniversary of his milestone mission and thank him, and all active military and veterans, for his dedicated service to our country.

Michael Maguire
President
Johnsville Centrifuge and Science Museum

c1959, John Glenn takes a break between training runs in the original “Mercury 7 Gondola” of the Johnsville Centrifuge

“MUSEUM IN THE PARK” TO BE PART OF WARMINSTER DAY TRICENTENNIAL FESTIVITIES

Johnsville Centrifuge and Science Museum to Showcase Artifacts on Loan from Patuxent River Naval Air Museum

Johnsville Centrifuge and Science Museum will be participating in this year’s Warminster Day this Saturday, September 10 from 11AM to 4PM at Warminster Community Park by featuring some recently acquired artifacts that have never been on display in the local area in a unique “Museum in the Park” setting.

Among the artifacts to be displayed will be a 1970s era test wing from an early pilotless drone and the 1950 dedication plaque from the centrifuge building, both of which are on loan from the Patuxent River Naval Air Museum (http://paxmuseum.com).  In addition, a rare fiberglass contour couch that was used for training in the centrifuge will be on display. The contour couch was acquired by the museum from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum.

NASA Ambassador Presentations
to Occur Throughout the Day

Also included in the program will be Dr. Ann Schmiedekamp, NASA Solar System Ambassador and Professor of Physics at Penn State University, who will be giving presentations throughout the day on the challenges involved in interplanetary travel.  Dr. Schmiedekamp is one of a handful of NASA Solar System Ambassadors in the country.

 Special Interpretive Programs to be Offered
at Mercury 7 Gondola 

 The museum will also be providing a special interpretive program at the Mercury 7 Gondola – the original centrifuge capsule that was in use from 1950 through 1963 which was brought back to Warminster earlier this year after 47 years in storage at the Smithsonian Institution. All of the Mercury and Gemini astronauts stepped into the Mercury 7 Gondola as part of their training.

In addition, Art Guntner, a retired Naval Chief who rode the Johnsville Centrifuge over 350 times and who personally helped to train the Mercury astronauts will be available to meet attendees and share his stories.

“We are thrilled to be a part of the Tricentennial festivities at Warminster Day this year,’ said Michael Maguire, President of the museum. “In its day NADC was the largest employer in the county where many important technical developments were made. We feel it fitting that we will be exhibiting these artifacts at an event that is taking place on the old runway of the facility. We are especially thankful to the Pax River Museum for the loan of these artifacts as well as to NASA and Dr. Schmiedekamp for generously agreeing to be a part of this event. It will be quite a day.”

 

Astronauts on Twitter

We just joined Twitter! And we are in good company! Check out this link to see all the astronauts, past, present and international, also on Twitter!