Stay in the loop. Sign up for our newsletter now.

* required

*







Email Newsletter by VerticalResponse

Posts Tagged ‘Apollo’

Spring Gala Tickets Now Available!

Tickets are now available for the third annual Spring Gala to benefit the Johnsville Centrifuge and Science Museum. The event will be held on April 28th from 5 to 10 PM at the VE Club at 130 Davisville Road, Warminster, PA. Tickets are available for $65 each with tables of eight and ten available.

As you may know, this past year saw the return of the original centrifuge gondola to Bucks County after 47 years at an outside storage yard in Maryland. In addition to our educational outreach programs, proceeds from this year’s event will go towards preservation of this important and unique artifact that was used to train the likes of Alan Shepard, John Glenn and Neil Armstrong.

The program for this year’s gala will include remarks by Dwayne A. Day, Space Historian and Senior Program Officer for the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Day also served as an investigator on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board in the wake of the disintegration of STS-107 during its reentry on February 1, 2003. Dr. Day will speak on the topic of the history of the US Space Program and little known facts about the Russian Space Program. It promises to be an interesting and informative evening.

Please help us honor the contributions made by our local community and inspire the youth of today to reach for the stars in all they do. Information about special sponsorship packages is available by calling 267-250-8841. Your sponsorship and/or attendance at this event will be much appreciated. If you are a local business owner and you would like to donate an item for the silent auction you may contact us at the above number or at nadcmuseum@comcast.net

History Made Here

Below is the text of an editorial that appeared in the Daily Intelligencer on Monday, May 9, 2011.

History made here

America’s space program has roots in Warminster

IT WAS ALL so new then, so unfamiliar, so much like something out of Capt. Video: On May 5, 1961 – 50 years ago – astronaut Alan B. Shepard, one of the original seven U.S. astronauts, became the first American in outer space.

The Russians had beaten us to manned flight – Yuri Gagarin did it in April of that year – just as they had shocked the United States and the world years earlier with the launch of Sputnik, the first artificial satellite.

By comparison, Gagarin’s ride – a 108-minute orbital trip – made Shepard’s 15-minute suborbital journey seem like a walk across the street.

Nevertheless, Shepard was hailed as a national hero with parades in several cities. President John F. Kennedy awarded him a medal. More importantly, Shepard’s “foot in the space door” launched America’s manned space program, which eventually overtook the Soviet Union’s and culminated with the first moon landing, Apollo 11, in July 1969. Shepard himself would walk on the moon in 1971 as the commander of Apollo 14.

Shepard retired from NASA in 1974 and died of leukemia on July 21, 1998, 21 years to the day after the first moon walk. Though he’ll never be forgotten as America’s first space pioneer, he’s back in the news for a couple of reasons.

Last week, the U.S. Postal Service issued a first-class stamp in Shepard’s honor.

And in an event much closer to home, the original centrifuge gondola that Shepard trained in during Project Mercury was returned to Warminster Township, where the former Johnsville Naval Air Development Center once was home to the world’s largest human centrifuge. The arrival of the gondola on May 5 coincided with the 50th anniversary of Shepard’s first flight.

Many other astronauts from the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs came to the NADC to ride the gondola and experience the effects of high G-forces that they would later be subjected to during launches.

After its days of spinning astronauts were over, the gondola became part of the collection at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington. But its place at the Smithsonian for well over four decades – in an outside storage yard, away from public view – hardly did proper justice to such a key contributor to the U.S. space program.

According to the Johnsville Centrifuge and Science Museum website, the return of the gondola to its home in Warminster is part of the Save Our History campaign sponsored by The History Channel.
Eventually, the gondola will be displayed at the centrifuge building.

That our early astronauts prepared for their journeys right in our own backyard is not a particularly well-known chapter in the story of America’s space program. The centrifuge gondola’s homecoming is a good reason to learn about the role Bucks County played in the nation’s early exploration of the final frontier.